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Meet Source

An App for artists and lovers alike

This user-generated app was designed for the full spectrum of those touched by urban art—Source bridges the gap between the artists and the viewer, broadening the understanding of the user while making monetization easier for the artist in a competitive landscape.

 
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Role

I executed this case study as a passion project. It is one of many that afforded me the experience and insight essential in building a well-rounded UX Designer’s toolbox. Creating the Source App started with UX research, content auditing, competitive analysis and strategy on information architecture. That was followed by wireframes and prototypes and lastly user interface design, visual branding, and digital illustration.

Services

-UX Research

-Information Architecture

-Interaction Design (iOS & Responsive Web)

-Visual UI Design

-Creative Direction

-Brand Strategy

 

Discovery

The discovery process began with a kickoff to establish the project goals and design strategy that would tackle the problems users were facing. We asked, how would a person go about learning more about the urban art they love to encounter in the streets of the cities they travel in? City dwelling art lovers who are Apple users who buy, share, or create art regularly. Those that frequently interact with an urban environment, who favorite simple, smart, and beautiful design, and who want trusted, accredited information through connecting directly to the source of their query. Our aim was to take down the mega apps that lack simplicity and drown out the answers users are seeking with a non-useful, mind-numbing content overload. I started the UX journey with user testing, walking the streets of cities, talking with people who stopped to take pictures of or gaze at the street art that surrounded them. I asked them about how they were gathering information about the art they loved and how they shared it or contacted the artists if they so pleased. In addition, I polled urban artists from all over to ask them how they preferred to connect to their viewers and monetize their makings.

“People love the art on their streets. Most who were interviewed expressed happiness and a wide-eyed interest when asked about the art in question. Users lack the information necessary to prompt their queries in Google or Instagram and would like a way to simply answer the question ‘Who made that?’, save their answers, and share or connect with the artist or friends.”

—Summary of Research Findings

 
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Features

My main goal in designing this App was to keep it simple—to do one thing really well. The problems the users were facing in answering their questions were based in using Swiss Army Knife Apps like Google or Instagram. They expressed frustration and annoyance in trying to satisfy their queries. It was of the utmost importance to dismantle this frustration by creating a clear and simple connection between the artist and the viewer. Put plainly, this app is an incredible digital tool to enhance learning for the viewer and customer base for the artist.

Source

This feature allows the user to identify and learn about a piece of street art they inquire about. The idea is to aggregate the data using existing social media art accounts, as well as by inviting artists to create a profile via Source. Reverse image search technology will then allow a user to take a picture and be directly connected to the information they seek.

Add Source

The Add Source Feature gives the artist a direct line of communication to those viewing their art, and vice versa. Artists can finally be given full accreditation for their work with personal commentary included, helping to bridge the gap between the artist and viewer, making the path to information and monetization easier on both ends of the user spectrum.

Save Source

This feature is simple and self-explanatory in that it allows the user to save the art they source to an aggregated list that they can access and explore whenever they choose. This relieves the pain of the user when they encounter a piece of art they love but are too busy doing other things to spend time learning more about it at that particular moment.

 
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Website

The Source app marketing website supports the launch of the mobile application with context and education around Source as a brand and as a tool for artists and art lovers alike. In addition to aiding in showcasing the apps offerings, the website also offers custom content from users on both ends of the spectrum—acting as another touchpoint for education on the urban art in cities all over the world. The visual design and graphics are on-brand with Source’s identity and mirror the look and feel of the app while providing a clean aesthetic that pairs well Apple’s look and consumer tech as an industry whole.

 
 
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Visual Identity

The visual style of Source was crafted to be as appealing as the art its users are interacting with. The overall aesthetic was aimed at being clean yet colorfully creative. It attracts those who value an art-filled lifestyle while also maintaining a sleek and simple UI that doesn’t muddy the useful purpose of the tool. Using dynamic imagery with a consistent gradient overlay afforded the ability to showcase a wide variety of styles while keeping the color palette cohesive and pleasing to the eye.

 
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